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Bernard Grech Challenges Government Accountability in Parliament Address

Feb 29 2024 Share

In a gripping parliamentary session on Wednesday, Opposition Leader Bernard Grech delivered a scathing critique of the government’s handling of construction site safety, particularly in light of the tragic death of Jean Paul Sofia. Grech called for accountability and reform within the Maltese government and the local construction laws and regulations.

Opening his address, Grech called for a moment of silence to honour Jean Paul Sofia and commended his family’s unwavering determination for justice amidst adversity. He emphasised the significance of their perseverance in the face of threats and insults.

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Grech then delved into a sobering recollection of recent construction-related incidents, including collapses and fatalities, painting a stark picture of systemic failures and negligence. He highlighted the emotional toll on families and the broader community, stressing that each tragedy represented a profound loss of life and shattered dreams.

The Opposition Leader criticised the government’s inaction and resistance to calls for a public inquiry into Jean Paul Sofia’s death, accusing them of prioritising political expediency over justice. Grech condemned what he described as a “culture of impunity” within the construction industry and lambasted the government’s failure to enforce regulations effectively.

Quoting extensively from the Public Inquiry report, Grech underscored its findings, including irregularities in regulatory oversight and systemic incompetence. He pointedly questioned why key government officials, including Ministers Stefan Zrinzo Azzopardi, Miriam Dalli, and Silvio Schembri, remained in their positions.

Throughout his speech, Grech rebuffed accusations of political opportunism, asserting that his advocacy for justice was not driven by populism but by a fundamental duty to uphold the rule of law and protect citizens’ safety.

In his conclusion, Grech reiterated the imperative for accountability and immediate action to prevent further tragedies. He thanked the Sofia family for their courage and resilience, affirming his commitment to securing justice on their behalf and for all Maltese citizens.

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Destiny Touring Europe & Australia with ‘Eurovision On Tour’

Destiny Touring Europe & Australia with 'Eurovision On Tour'
Feb 29 2024 Share

Maltese Eurovision sensation Destiny is embarking on an electrifying European and Australian tour, bringing the Maltese Eurovision spirit directly to fans in a ground-breaking spectacle dubbed ‘Eurovision On Tour’.

A recent social media update revealed that Destiny has already arrived in Madrid, Spain, marking the exhilarating commencement of the tour. Representing Malta, Destiny joins an impressive lineup of Eurovision alumni, including the iconic Sunstroke Project, Emmelie de Forest, Linda Martin, and others.

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The tour, spanning from October to January, promises more dates to be announced, extending the Eurovision celebration even further. Destiny joins the star-studded line-up, having represented Malta back in 2021 with her track ‘Je Me Casse’, which had placed 7th in the grand finals.

Attendees will have the unique opportunity to relive some of the competition’s most memorable moments, brought to life by its star-studded performers. From Destiny’s powerhouse vocals to the unforgettable saxophone riffs of Sunstroke Project, the tour is set to be a dazzling showcase of Eurovision’s finest talents.

Major kudos to Malta’s own Destiny for keeping the Eurovision spirit alive ahead of this year’s contest!

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Why Do We Get a Leap Day Every Four Years?

Why Do We Get a Leap Day Every Four Years?
Feb 29 2024 Share

Every four years, we get an extra day added to our calendar, making February 29th a special day known as a leap day. But why do we do this? It’s all about keeping our clocks and calendars in sync with Earth’s journey around the Sun.

You see, it doesn’t take exactly 365 days for the Earth to orbit the Sun. It takes about 365.24 days. This extra bit of time, about a quarter of a day each year, adds up. Without fixing this, our calendar would slowly fall out of step with the seasons. Imagine summer starting in what our calendar calls winter, after many years without correction!

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To stop this from happening, we add one extra day every four years to catch up with the extra time. This is what we call a leap year. This idea has been around for a long time. It started with the Julian Calendar over 2,000 years ago and was tweaked a bit when we switched to the Gregorian Calendar, which most of the world uses today.

So, leap years help make sure that our calendars keep matching up with the Earth’s trip around the Sun, keeping seasons and timekeeping accurate for everyone.

Do you know someone with their birthday on a leap day.

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Chicken Vs. Egg: Scientists Finally Reveal Which Came First

Chicken Vs. Egg: Scientists Finally Reveal Which Came First
Feb 29 2024 Share

The question of whether the chicken or the egg came first is a tale as old as time. Throughout history, philosophers and scientists have pondered over this riddle, seeking answers in theology, biology, and evolution… but scientists have finally given us the answer.

Notably, Christian philosophers like Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas posited that the chicken came first, created by God as part of the animal kingdom. However, a modern scientific twist to this age-old question has been provided by researchers from BBC Science, shedding light on the debate with evolutionary evidence.

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According to scientists, the answer leans in favour of the egg. “Eggs are much older than chickens,” they argue, pointing out that dinosaurs, the predecessors of modern birds, laid eggs long before chickens appeared on the scene. They explain, “Dinosaurs laid eggs, the fish that first crawled out of the sea laid eggs, and the weird articulated monsters that swam in the warm shallow seas of the Cambrian Period 500 million years ago also laid eggs.” In contrast, domestic chickens, as we know them today, only started appearing around 10,000 years ago.

BBC Science Focus’s Luis Villazon further clarifies, “But it doesn’t matter; at some point in evolutionary history when there were no chickens, two birds that were almost-but-not-quite chickens mated and laid an egg that hatched into the first chicken.” This explanation underscores the evolutionary process, suggesting that the egg predates the chicken, albeit the egg in question wasn’t laid by a chicken as we recognise today.

Are you satisfied with the answer?

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